Friday, October 3, 2014

The Village group 3

Miller-Wood

Please share your best insights, observations, and questions here.  Between Friday evening (10/3) and Sunday evening (10/5), please post at least twice.  Think of this as an online dialogue--respond to others, make connections, support thinking, and link to big picture/argument.

19 comments:

  1. When Noah is attempting to Kill Lucius I thought that Noah seemed to represent Abigail, and Lucius seemed to be John Proctor; Noah accidentally, out of rage dooms Lucius to death, in a spiral of his own fear of what will come out of the situation.

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  2. Upon Lucius entering the woods when patrolling the edges of the town I believed that Lucius is trying to prove that there is nothing to fear, yet when he discovers there is it is much like when the people of Salem want to believe that witch craft is not happening, and the girls (Abigail, Mary, ect.) make it out to be happening, and a very large problem.

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  3. When a note is found in what seems to be a town meeting, bearing Lucius' apology for crossing the woods, it related to Proctor shamefully bearing his name in front of those that are in charge of the community; when trying to spare his wife and those that are innocent that have been accused.He is playing the scapegoat.

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  4. There are three quotes that really stood out to me from The Village. The first one was when Ivy is talking to Mr. Walker and she says, “You are my father, I will listen to you in all things”. At first I was thinking about how in the Christian religion, christians are God's children and they are to listen to him. Then I started thinking about when Ivy as in the woods and how she put her hands up to sacrifice herself before tricking Noah to fall into the hole. In this case, I think that Ivy represents Jesus and Mr. Walker, God (to some extent). When they are speaking outside of the shed after Ivy learns of the farce, it made me think of Jesus in the garden before his death, and how he was praying not to die but did anyways out of obedience and love for the people of the earth (represented by the townsfolk). This brings me to the next quote that i think stood out, which was when Mr. Walker tells Ivy that “[She] see[s] light when there is only darkness”. This is representative of Jesus because, in comparison, both Ivy and Jesus were seen as light and as the hope for the people, as the world had fallen into darkness. I think it also represents her relationships with those around her, and how she is the hope. She is the hope to Kitty after rejection, the light and fun to Noah, and the hope to Lucius that he is acting out of the righteousness of his heart. Again, this makes me think of Jesus and his companions on Earth and how he changed the way they lived. Maybe Noah represents Judas?

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  5. The third quote that stood out to me was when Lucius says “I will not worry about what will happen, only what needs to be done”. I think that this connects to the Crucible as John Proctor is being led to his execution, and how he knows that what needs to be done is him being sacrificed to end the witch trials, just like Lucius had to be stabbed for Ivy to go into the woods and return with a reason for the community to continue. They both want to do what is best for their community and are willing to sacrifice for it. I also think it's interesting how Lucius originally wants to go into the woods to get medicine for Noah, and Noah ends up almost killing him, versus how Hale starts the scapegoating madness and Proctor dies to keep anyone else (including Hale and his wife) from being hanged. Are the roles flipped?

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    1. I believe that Mr. Proctor is more like Hale being that when everything starts he is fully prepared to do anything,with the beasts and all, to keep the town as it is. Over time Mr, Walker begins to change, and becomes more like Hale where he wants to help them out of the problem.

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  6. Based on my previous two comments, who do you think is more representative of Jesus, Lucius or Ivy? Who is more alike to John Proctor? Why or why not?

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    1. I find Lucius to be more representative of Jesus. The only thing that Ivy really did for me to connect her to Jesus was when she stuck her arms out like the cross, as she waited for Noah to charge her so she could quickly step out of the way. Lucius' selflessness continually reminded me of Jesus, especially when he says "I will not worry about what will happen, only what needs to be done." Lucius puts everyone else before himself which is quite against human nature. Like we saw in the Crucible nearly everyone put themselves before others which is revealing of our human nature. Lucius did quite the opposite, like when the monsters attacked the village, he did all he could to protect the people, especially Ivy.

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  7. What do you think of the directors choice, when filming The Village, of making the camera's perspective out of different doors and/or windows? Is this significant? Why or why not?

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    1. It is significant. The idea of containment comes into play. No matter what, the characters in the movie are never free. As revealed at the end, they are living basically in a bubble. The doors and windows are a constant reminder that the characters are on the inside.

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  8. One thing I found to be extremely important in this movie was the usage of color. The director made it very clear to the audience the distinction between good and evil. Yellow, which was the color of the cloaks and flags of those who lived in the valley represented good. Psychologically, when people see the color yellow they think of light and warmth which is very easily associated with "the good guys." The color red is representative of "the bad guys" because often times the color red makes people think of blood. Blood makes people think of unhappiness and discomfort, hence the producers decision to represent evil with the color red.

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    1. I think it's interesting that in many places, yellow also signifies remembrance or resistance.
      In many religions and cultures, yellow is the color of mourning; it's worn after people die as a sign of respect and recognition. The Village was created after the deaths of many of the villager's family members.
      Yellow is also used as a color of resistance - right now in Hong Kong, student and citizen protesters are wearing yellow to signify their opposition against China's current government. The Village was created as a resistance against the real world, turning their backs and opposing the corruption and crime taking place in modern day.

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  9. As previously mentioned, color plays a huge role in the film. Ivy can see faint color given off by people but she never specifies what those colors are. What do you think Lucius Hunt's color is? Mr. Walker?

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    1. Color brings out different emotions in everyone. My dad has a friend who is blind. While we think of emotions, he sees them. He sees different colors based upon how he feels about it. He always knows when his wife is around because he can "see" his love for her. Although he cannot describe what the exact color looks like, He says that it's a color he never could see when he wasn't blind. So maybe Ivy isn't actually seeing a color for Lucius, she's feeling love for him and that is what replaces her sight.

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    2. I believe that Ivy see's yellow being that it is the easiest color to see, and that it is a symbolic color in the film; I believe she loves Lucius ,because she sees a light for him, and for her father I believe that she sees a red color, being that he was hiding the fact that they were the beasts. She wouldn't know the color to be bad though, because she cannot connect it to the forbidden color the town speaks of.

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  10. One very important quote regarding how humans deal with fear is “You may run from sorrow as we have”(The Village). The elders of the village ran instead of facing their fears. Their running is like many people in both modern day society and in The Crucible. In The Crucible, Abigail Williams took a similar path when she ran to Barbados instead of staying and facing the consequences of her actions.

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  11. I thought the entire premise of The Village played a lot off the focus question about ignorance, power, and fear - to maintain power over the village, the Elders had to use the ignorance about the forest surrounding their town and scare the villagers into staying put. Also similar to The Crucible was the amount of denial the villagers had about everything; they blamed the stripping of animals on coyotes and denied that it was Those They Don't Speak Of - the entire Village was created around denial of the real world.

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  12. A connection I made between the Crucible and The Village was how both the protagonists (Lucius and John) were hurt (mentally/physically) because of love. For example, most of the hysteria was caused by Abby’s love for John Proctor; Which Abby accused Goody Proctor of witchcraft because of her love for John. And then Noah stabbed Lucius partly because Noah liked Ivy, and Ivy and Lucius were to get married. So, in both stories, love can make a person do irrational things.

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  13. A question I have is: Why didn't the director/writer begin the movie with the elders creating the Village? And then had the ending of the movie with the creation of the monsters? Would this of created a more compelling movie?

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